Rainwater falling on Central London to be drained straight into the Thames, preventing flooding |
 

 

Rainwater falling on Central London to be drained straight into the Thames, preventing flooding

Wednesday, August 10th, 2016

Rainwater falling on Nine Elms in the heart of the city is to be drained straight into the Thames to prevent flooding.

Last month saw the unveiling of a radical environmental initiative at the South Bank zone being transformed between Vauxhall and Battersea Power Station, Nine Elms.

With a hefty price tag of £14 million, the latest project is the largest sustainable urban drainage system in the UK. Using landscaping and new buildings to capture the rainwater, the water will be channelled into large pipes buried beneath the new Nine Elms park development. The water will then be pumped into the Thames through a new pumping station.

Many eco-friendly features such green roofs, swales and streets with rainwater gardens that allow water to evaporate (meaning less volume flowing into the river) have been added to the project to further reduce the flood risk.

As well as reducing the risk of flooding, the project has many benefits. The move will reduce pollution and eliminate the need to treat the water to decreasing the pressure on our sewers.

“The latest sustainable urban drainage project, although expensive, is vital to ensuring that we are reducing the risk of flooding in London,” explains Fraser Ruthven, Head of Marketing and Growth at London Drainage.

“With the arrival of the US embassy to the area, the development of Battersea Power Station into a living space and two new tube stations that are currently under construction, the project is a welcome addition to the Nine Elms area. It is extremely important that precautions are taken to ensure as little pressure as possible is put on our sewers.”

For more information on the drainage planning and maintenance services offered by London Drainage, please contact the company directly.

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